on Tuesday, 20 May 2014

What is Search Engine Optimization (SEO)?

SEO is the practice of improving and promoting a web site in order to increase the number of visitors the site receives from search engines. There are many aspects to SEO, from the words on your page to the way other sites link to you on the web. Sometimes SEO is simply a matter of making sure your site is structured in a way that search engines understand.
Search Engine Optimization isn't just about "engines." It's about making your site better for people too. At Moz we believe these principles go hand in hand.
This guide is designed to describe all areas of SEO - from discovery of the terms and phrases (keywords) that generate traffic, to making a site search engine friendly, to building the links and marketing the unique value of the site/organization's offerings. Don't worry, if you are confused about this stuff, you are not alone.

Why does my website need SEO?

The majority of web traffic is driven by the major commercial search engines - Google, Bing and Yahoo!. Although social media and other types of traffic can generate visits to your website, search engines are the primary method of navigation for most Internet users. This is true whether your site provides content, services, products, information or just about anything else.
Search engines are unique in that they provide targeted traffic - people looking for what you offer. Search engines are the roadways that makes this happen. If your site cannot be found by search engines or your content cannot be put into their databases, you miss out on incredible opportunities available to websites provided via search.
Search queries, the words that users type into the search box, carry extraordinary value. Experience has shown that search engine traffic can make (or break) an organization's success. Targeted visitors to a website can provide publicity, revenue, and exposure like no other channel of marketing. Investing in SEO, whether through time or finances, can have an exceptional rate of return compared to other types of marketing and promotion.

Why can't the search engines figure out my site without SEO?

Search engines are smart, but they still need help. The major engines are always working towards improving their technology to crawl the web more deeply and return better results to users. However, there is a limit to how search engines can operate. Whereas the right SEO can net you thousands of visitors and attention, the wrong moves can hide or bury your site deep in the search results where visibility is minimal.
In addition to making content available to search engines, SEO also helps boost rankings so that content will be placed where searchers will more readily find it. The Internet is becoming increasingly competitive, and those companies who perform SEO will have a decided advantage in visitors and customers.

Can I do SEO for myself?

The world of SEO is complex, but most people can easily understand the basics. Even a small amount of knowledge can make a big difference. For the most part, SEO education is free and available on the web, including guides like this. Combine this with a little practice and you are well on your way to becoming a guru.
Depending on your time commitment, willingness to learn, and complexity of your website(s), you may decide you need an expert to handle things for you. Firms that practice SEO can vary; some have a highly specialized focus, while others take a more broad and general approach. Optimizing a web site for search engines can require looking at so many unique elements that many practitioners of SEO (SEOs) consider themselves to be in the broad field of optimization and website strategy.
Still, even in this case, it's good to have a firm grasp of the core concepts.

How much of this article do I need to read?

If you are serious about improving search traffic and are unfamiliar with SEO, we recommend reading this guide front-to-back. It's short and easy to understand. There's a printable PDF version for those who'd prefer, and dozens of linked-to resources on other sites and pages that are worthy of your attention. Because you've given us your attention.
on Thursday, 1 May 2014
            How to Install Ubuntu Linux
                 1. Installing From CD/DVD   
Ubuntu is one of the most popular forms of the Linux operating system. It is available for free, and will run on almost any computer. This guide will show you how to install Ubuntu by booting from a CD or within Windows itself.

                        Method of  Installing From CD/DVD

Download the Ubuntu ISO file.   You can get the ISO file from the Ubuntu website. An ISO file is a CD image file that will need to be burned before you can use it. There are two options available from the Ubuntu website (you can also buy official Ubuntu CDs, which come in packs of 10): 12.04 LTS has continuous updates and provides technical support. It is scheduled to be supported until April 2017. This option will give you the most compatibility with your existing hardware.

  • 13.04 is the latest Ubuntu build, and comes with limited support. It has the newest features, though they may not work with all hardware. This release is geared more towards experienced Linux users.
  • If you have a Windows 8 PC or a PC with UEFI firmware, download the 64-bit version of Ubuntu. Most older machines should download the 32-bit version.
    2. Burn the ISO file. 
    Open up your burning program of choice. There are free and paid programs available that can burn an ISO to a CD or DVD.
  • Windows 7, 8, and Mac OS X can all burn ISO files to a disc without having to download a separate program.
        Boot from the disc. Once you have finished burning the disc, restart your computer and choose to boot from the disc. You may have to change your boot preferences by hitting the Setup key while your computer is restarting. This is typically F12, F2, or Del.
    4.  Try Ubuntu before installing.
      Once you boot from the disc, you will be given the option to try Ubuntu without installing it. The operating system will run from the disc, and you will have a chance to explore the layout of the operating system. Open the Examples folder to see how Ubuntu handles files and exploring the operating system.
  • Once you are done exploring, open the Install file on the desktop.
    5.  Install Ubuntu. 
    Your computer will need at least 4.5 GB of free space. You will want more than this if you want to install programs and create files. If you are installing on a laptop, make sure that it is connected to a power source, as installing can drain the battery faster than normal. Check the “Download updates automatically” box, as well as the “Install this third-party software” box. The third-party software will allow you to play MP3 files as well as watch Flash video (such as YouTube).
    6.  Set up the wireless connection. 
    If your computer is not connected to the internet via Ethernet, you can configure your wireless connection in the next step.
  • If you didn’t have an internet connection in the previous step, hit the Back button after setting up the wireless connection so that you can enable automatic updates.
    7.  Choose what to do with your existing operating system.
    If you have Windows installed on your system, you will be given a couple options on how you’d like to install Ubuntu. You can either install it alongside your previous Windows installation, or you can replace your Windows installation with Ubuntu. If you install it alongside your old version of Windows, you will be given the option to choose your operating system each time you reboot your computer. Your Windows files and programs will remain untouched.
  • If you replace your installation of Windows with Ubuntu all of your Windows files, documents, and programs will be deleted.
    8.   Set your partition size.
    If you are installing Ubuntu alongside Windows, you can use the slider to adjust how much space you would like to designate for Ubuntu. Remember that Ubuntu will take up about 4.5 GB when it is installed, so be sure to leave some extra space for programs and files. Once you are satisfied with your settings, click Install Now.
    9.  Choose your location.
    If you are connected to the internet, this should be done automatically. Verify that the timezone displayed is correct, and then click the Continue button.
    10.  Set your keyboard layout.
    You can choose from a list of options, or click the Detect Keyboard Layout button to have Ubuntu automatically pick the correct option.
    11.  Enter your login information.
    Enter your name, the name of the computer (which will be displayed on the network), choose a username, and come up with a password. You can choose to have Ubuntu automatically log you in, or require your username and password when it starts.
       Wait for the installation process to complete.
    Once you choose your login info, the installation will begin. During setup, various tips for using Ubuntu will be displayed on the screen. Once it is finished, you will be prompted to restart the computer and Ubuntu  will load.